Nerdy Bookahs and their travel guide: Freiburg & Strasbourg

It is once again time for a real-life related blog post. Back to this blog’s roots, basically, but in real life instead of wandering through virtual worlds. This time we did go to a part in Southern Germany, to the wonderful town called Freiburg, and on our way back home, we made a detour to stop in Strasbourg, a town in France.

We did not encounter anything gaming-related like we did in Koblenz. However, both towns are still so pretty and picturesque that we wanted to share the scenery with you anyway.

Freiburg is a town located in Southern Germany (not in Bavaria, though, but in Baden Württemberg). I will spare you its history, as you can read all about it in the Wikipedia entry anyway. It is an old town, but that should not come to you as a surprise. This is Germany, not the USA, after all. ;) We also spent our time there (3 days) in the old town with only taking short glimpses at the rest of the town. We visited three museums, but did not take any pictures in there. We also went shopping for new small pillows as our hotel’s pillows were horrible (huge ones) and we had both woken up with stiff necks after our first night. And we stumbled into an Irish pub right before the Champion’s League game of Bayern München against… some other team… started. We had only been there for Guinness and burgers, so we ate and drank and then left again. The only time I’m a fan of watching football games is when it’s the World Cup. Maybe a couple of games for the European Cup, but not even that most of the time.

I guess we could have looked at everything in half the available time, but it was good that we had that much time since my hip is still “injured” (not really injured per se, but for the lack of a better description, let’s call it like this) and walking has to happen slowly. I had originally hoped to use the gondola lift to get up to “Schauinsland“, a mountain (with a very weird name, I might add). But with my hip, we didn’t even consider this – which doesn’t matter, as I just saw that the lift is down for maintenance at the moment anyway. Instead, we used the best day with lots of sun to slowly walk up the path until we were at a platform from which we could see the town quite well already. So we had decided to stop there and then walk back down again. I guess this means that we will have to go back to that region some day to use the lift and go up there!

What’s special about Freiburg is their little “Bächle” everywhere. We did wonder how many small dogs probably fall into them every year… :p Oddly enough, we saw an exceptionally large amount of large dogs in Freiburg, but hardly any small ones. Coincidence? I don’t think so…

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On our way back home, we made a detour to France to visit Strasbourg. I have always found countries’ borders fascinating. I remember asking my parents lots and lots of questions about borders when I was young. I knew what border controls were as we had passed through them regularly when going to Italy for a summer vacation, for example. But what confused me was: So there is this one border control here on this road… but… couldn’t we walk off-road and just walk into another country that way? Either way, there is no border control between Germany and France. You just drive on the road over a bridge connecting the German town Kehl with Strasbourg, without stopping and you’re there. The transition from Germany to France was noticeable by one thing mainly: At first, the street signs were in German, then they were in French. Yes, as easy as that. We spent the morning and early afternoon in Petite France. What shocked me was the complete lack of knowledge of the French language on my part. I had taken it for four years at school, but have not used the language at all for about 17 years or so. We understood enough to get around, though, and lots of people there even speak German. In fact, because of the city’s history, a lot of things sound very German over there like street names and so on. It was definitely interesting as I have never been to that part of France and I wouldn’t mind going there again. Especially because they have great tarte flambée.

Before I bore you even more, though, I will end this little report with pictures of Strasbourg, as mentioned, mainly from Petite France.

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2 thoughts on “Nerdy Bookahs and their travel guide: Freiburg & Strasbourg

  1. Thanks for sharing this. Those towns are beautiful! Now I wish I could visit it too. :)

    I also don’t care much about football, except during World Cup and even then I might just ignore it, depending on my mood.

    I also found the Bächle pretty interesting. I love these little things built to solve a problem back in the day and then centuries later it becomes something unique for its town. Poor little dogs though. :)

    Like

    1. I was just constantly scared I would trip into them. This is the kind of thing that is just so typical for me. :p

      If you ever do come here, make sure to stop by that general region (Southern Germany and France border). :)

      Liked by 1 person

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